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Blowouts VS Silk Press

 Do you know the difference between a Blowout and a Silk Press?  Both techniques, if applied correctly, produce amazing results and can be done on all hair textures.  Even though the names are pretty much self explanatory, it is very common to find them both mislabeled on social media. In this article, I will break down each and every step I take to create a perfect blowout on all hair textures and a silk press on natural hair. 

  How exactly do you make the ideal blowout? In order to create a smooth blowout, it is important to start off with shampooing the hair twice. The first wash should be with a clarifying shampoo and the second should involve a moisturizing shampoo. Following these steps will almost certainly produce lightweight and hydrated hair. After the second shampoo, you should follow up with a conditioner or a hydration treatment working towards the midshaft to the ends. Make a conscious effort to keep the conditioner/treatment away from the roots because It may weigh down the hair. If you desire volume at the roots, you should try to apply minimal product there. In order to help skim time off the blowout preparation, detangle the hair while the conditioner or treatment is still in it. Next, rinse the hair with lukewarm water and dry it with a towel. 

  You are now at the step where you need to apply the product all over and rough dry the hair about twenty percent; I prefer to use an all-in-one product that is sprayable. For example, “It’s a 10” is one of my favorite sprays to use on all hair textures. Next, separate the hair into sections no larger than the width of the round brush you would use on the hair. The goal here is to keep the hair uniform throughout the blowdry process. Focus on blowing out the root first and then proceed towards the ends. A seasoned blowout specialist will keep the brush rocking and will lock the brush at the root. Follow up with a cool blast to seal the cuticle as this will cause the hair to shine and hold a curl. 

  After the section is cool, curl the hair and clip the section continuing this same technique throughout the entire head. Once all pincurls are cool, drop each section and style the hair accordingly. The hair should be super bouncy and have a decent amount of volume. To help the style last longer, take 2×2 sections and curl or wave the hair accordingly with a hot tool, which is also great to use when smoothing out resistant baby hair. You have now reached the final step which is to apply your finishing spray. And just like that…WAH-LAH!… a perfect blowout. At this point, the hair should look extremely natural and the movement should be impeccable. This style can be applicable for all hair types, but for coarser textures it may not last as long as a silk press for natural hair.

  I just gave you a step-by-step guide to the ideal blowout, now it’s time to talk about the silk press. The silk press was once called a “press and curl” and the only difference between the two are the tools used to perform the task. I vividly remember getting my hair done with a hot comb used to press out my roots and ends along with a big barrel curling tool used to add style. The crazy thing about it was that I never saw hairstylists use a heat protect on my hair. Times have really changed, and with that being said, allow me to instruct you on the best way to create a silk press in this day and age. A silk press has the same exact hair steps previously discussed in the blowout process up until you reach the blowdry and styling section. Typically, this process of designing hair is used on a tighter curl pattern.

I’m sure you are wondering why this is so, and it’s my job to explain it to you. Curlier hair typically needs more heat to create a smooth polished look and that’s where the silk comes into play. Most cosmetologists use a paddle brush and a high-powered blow dryer to smooth out the hair, while some beauticians use blow dryers with a detachable comb to straighten the hair. Either way works perfectly fine and it’s up to the discretion of the hairstylist. 

  When I’m styling hair, I use a heat protectant before blowing out the hair to help ensure that I’m protecting the hair from heat damage as much as possible. Once this step is completed, the hair should have some type of movement. If your hair isn’t moving after your blow dry it then it’s a good chance that you need a trim. After the blowout, you should follow up with another heat protectant and create small horizontal sections starting from the back occipital bone (back of the head).

Next, take your titanium or ceramic flat irons and smooth out the roots to ends with your flat iron chasing your heat resistant rat-tail comb. This helps with controlling the hair and minimizing the oil from your hands transferring onto the hair. Follow these steps until you reach the outer perimeter of the head. For the outer perimeter of the hair line, also known as “baby hair” or “kitchen”, you pinch that hair and smooth it out as much as you can. Now that your hair is straight you can proceed with big sections and curl the hair with the same flat iron used to straighten it.  Finally, apply any finishing products and style the hair as desired. The hair should be super silky (shine) and movement should also persist within this style. 
  

As illustrated, the major difference between a blowout and a silk press is the blow dry techniques, section sizes, the amount of heat applied to the hair, and the amount of time to accomplish both styles. Thank you so much for taking the time out to read this tutorial. It will be very much appreciated if you share this post on all social media platforms. If you’re ever in the Greater Washington DC area and need a mobile hair stylist, please do not hesitate to schedule your next at-home hair service with Enigma at 240-244-9828 or by clicking here to schedule your appointment.

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